*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
I - Z

Jacquard Stitch

Kalem Stitch

Kelim Stitch

Kilim Stitch

Knitting Stitch

Knitting Stitch (Diagonal)

Knitting Stitch 
(Reverse Tvistom)

Knotted Stitch

Knotted Stitch (Single)

Ladder Stitch

Leaf Stitch

Leaf Stitch (Diagonal)

Leaf Stitch with Backstitch

Leviathan Stitch

Leviathan Stitch (Double)

Leviathan Stitch 
(Triple)

Long Armed Cross Stitch

Long Stitch

Long and Short Stitch

Loop Stitch

Mexican Cross Stitch

Milanese Stitch

Montenegrin Stitch

Moorish Stitch

Mosaic Stitch

Mosaic Stitch (Crossed)

Mound Stitch

Nobuko Stitch

Oblique Stitch

Oblique Stitch (Diagonal)

Oblique Stitch (Reverse)

Oblique Slav Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch with Backstitch

Oriental Stitch

Outline Stitch

Palestrina Stitch

Palace Pattern Stitch

Paris Stitch

Parisian Stitch

Pavillion Stitch

Perspective Stitch

Plait Stitch

Plait Stitch (Crossed)

Plait Stitch (Square)

Plaited Edge Stitch

Plaited Gobelin Stitch

Plaited Interlaced Stitch

Portuguese Cross Stitch

Portuguese Stem Stitch

Princess Pattern Stitch

Pyramid Stitch

Quick Point

Raised Stitch

Raised Cross Stitch

Ray Stitch

Ray Stitch (Expanded)

Renaissance Stitch

Rep Stitch

Reverse Bargello

Reversed Basketweave Stitch

Reversed Cross Stitch

Rhodes Stitch

Ribbed Wheels Stitch

Rice Stitch

Rice Stitch (Padded)

Rococco Stitch

Roman Stitch

Rope Stitch

Roumanian Stitch

Rug Binding Stitch

Rya Stitch

Satin Stitch

Satin Stitch
 (Alternating)

Satin Stitch
 (Padded)

Scotch Stitch

Scotch Stitch (Alternating)

Scotch Stitch (Condensed)

Scotch Stitch (Crossed)

Scotch Stitch (Woven)

Scottish Stitch

Sheaf Stitch

Shell Stitch

Single Knotted Stitch

Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Smyrna Cross Stitch

Sorbello Stitch

Soumak Stitch

Spanish Stitch

Spider Web Stitch

Split Stitch

Sprats Head Stitch

Square Plait Stitch

Star Stitch

Star Stitch (Large)

Stem Stitch

Stem Stitch
 (Diagonal)

Stepped Sheaf Stitch

Surrey Stitch

Sutherland Pattern Stitch

Tapestry Stitch

Tent Stitch

Tent Stitch (Alternating)

Tent Stitch
 (Diagonal Mosaic)

Tie Stitch

Trame

Trammed Tent Stitch

Triangle Stitch

Tufting Stitch

Turkey Stitch

Tvistom Stitch

Two Sided Italian 
Cross Stitch

Upright Cross Stitch

Van Dyke Stitch

Velvet Stitch

Waffle Stitch

Wave Stitch (Closed)

Wave Stitch (Open)

Weaving Stitch

Web Stitch

Wheat Sheaf Stitch

Woven Band Stitch 

Woven Pattern 
Stitch


Aubusson Stitch - Diagram 1
Aubusson Stitch - Diagram 2
Aubusson Stitch - Diagram 3
AUBUSSON STITCH
The Aubusson Stitch is also referred to as The Rep Stitch. This stitch must always be worked on penelope (double) canvas. The reason for this is because the stitches use 
Aubusson Stitch (Diagram 1):
Separate the horizontal threads at A and bring the needle through, move to the right across one double canvas intersection, bring the needle down at B. Separate the horizontal threads at C and bring the needle through, move to the right across one double canvas intersection, bring the needle down at D. Separate the horizontal threads at E and bring the needle through, move to the right across one double canvas intersection, bring the needle down at F. Now, continue on to Diagram 2...
Aubusson Stitch (Diagram 2):
Bring the needle up at G, move up and to the right over one canvas intersection, separate the horizontal threads at H and bring the needle down through H. Bring the needle up at I, move up and to the right over one canvas intersection, separate the horizontal threads at J and bring the needle down through J. Bring the needle up at K, move up and to the right over one canvas intersection, separate the horizontal threads at L and bring the needle down through L. Now, continue on to Diagram 3...
Aubusson Stitch (Diagram 3):
This diagram illustrates how the Aubusson Stitch should look when complete...
 
both the regular wide meshes as well as the small spaces between the horizontal double threads. This stitch is generally used for extremely fine detail work. We have demonstrated this stitch using the horizontal method. However, it may also be worked vertically. Three diagrams have been used to demonstrate this stitch. 
Diagonal Stitches: The Greatest Hits  
Part 2 The Detail Stitches
By: Carolyn McNeil
10/1/2007

In part 1 of “Diagonal Stitches: The Greatest Hits” I discussed diagonal stitches that were suitable for covering large areas and backgrounds. In this article I will describe diagonal stitches that are suitable for small  detail work. I will also mention some of the decorative diagonal stitches. As I mentioned in the first part of this 2-part series, diagonal stitches are stitches that are "at a slant" or "diagonal" (hence the name, diagonal stitch).
The most popular detail stitches in the diagonal stitch family are tent stitches, also known as petit point. There are three specific tent stitches. They include the basketweave stitch, the continental stitch and the half-cross stitch. All three of these tent stitches are worked diagonally over one canvas intersection. Although the finished look of the three stitches is identical, the method of working each stitch differs. The basketweave stitch is always worked diagonally across the canvas. The first row is worked diagonally down the canvas and, once complete, a second row is worked diagonally up the canvas. The continental stitch may be worked horizontally or vertically. Because of this, the continental stitch is a favored choice for outlining. The half-cross stitch may also be worked horizontally or vertically. However, this stitch should only be worked on penelope (double) canvas. The half-cross stitch does not use as much yarn as the other two tent stitches. Therefore, the finished piece is not as durable as the other two. There is also another variation of the tent stitch. It is referred to as the trammed tent stitch. Basically, this stitch consists of two parts. The first part of this stitch is one straight stitch worked horizontally across the small holes of penelope canvas. This creates the trammed part of the stitch. The second part of this stitch is where the tent stitches are worked over the trammed stitch. The trammed tent stitch is worked on double canvas only. The trammed tent stitch creates an extremely tough surface and is great for covering the cushions of chairs. This variation of the tent stitch will cover the canvas completely. The aubusson stitch is also referred to as the rep stitch. This stitch must always be worked on penelope (double) canvas. The reason for this is because the stitches use both the regular wide meshes as well as the small spaces between the horizontal double threads. This stitch is generally used for extremely fine detail work. The aubusson stitch may be worked horizontally or vertically.

There are two types of diagonal gobelin stitches, the slanted gobelin stitch and the encroaching slanted gobelin stitch. There are also straight gobelin stitches. The diagonal gobelin stitches are worked horizontally across the canvas. and may be adapted in size to suit many different types of work. The difference between the two stitches exists in the formation of subsequent rows. The slanted gobelin stitch works the second row into the bottom canvas holes of the first row. The encroaching gobelin stitch, however, works the second row one canvas thread above the bottom of the first row of stitches. This is where it “encroaches” upon the preceding row and where the name is derived from.

The diagonal buttonhole stitch is a fairly simple and decorative stitch to work. When complete, it gives the appearance of a row of candy canes. Please keep in mind that this stitch is easily snagged. Also, this stitch should be worked in a diagonal line. Although the diagonal buttonhole stitch will not cause the canvas to distort, it should ALWAYS be worked on a frame. It is important to maintain an even tension with this stitch, which is where the frame is necessary.

The diagonal leaf stitch is another example of an interesting decorative diagonal stitch. When complete, it forms the shape of a leaf. This stitch is fairly snag-proof and well-padded. Although slow to work, it makes an interesting pattern. For a more exciting look, you may want to try working four diagonal leaf stitches into one center, creating the shape of a flower.

I have saved the most obvious diagonal stitch for last, the diagonal stitch. The diagonal stitch is the main stitch on which all other stitches in the diagonal stitch family are based. This stitch is excellent for creating a patterned look. However, it is notorious for warping the canvas. A consistent tension must be maintained when working this stitch if you hope to avoid warping the canvas. The length of the stitches can be adjusted to whatever you want. Just be sure to remember: the longer the stitch, the more apt it is to snag.

The tent stitches, the aubusson stitch, the slanted gobelin stitch, the encroaching slanted gobelin stitch, and the basic diagonal stitch are all detail stitches. Although some of these stitches may be used for backgrounds or filling stitches, they tend to warp the canvas. I would recommend using these as detail stitches only. The diagonal buttonhole stitch and the diagonal leaf stitch are decorative stitches. Decorative stitches tend to be used along side or over other stitches to create a 3-D or embellished look. Do not be afraid to experiment with these stitches to see what look you prefer. In this two-part series I have chosen to focus on some of the more interesting diagonal stitches, or, the “greatest hits” of the diagonal stitch family. For a more detailed list of diagonal stitches available and instructions (with diagrams) for working each stitch, visit the Diagonal Stitches page at Stitchopedia.com  and click on whichever stitch is of interest to you. Happy Stitchin’… 
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
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*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
A - I

2,4,6,8 & Tie Stitch

Algerian Eye Stitch

Algerian Eye Daisy
 Stitch

Algerian Filling Stitch

Algerian Plait Stitch

Alternating Cross 
Stitch

Astrakhan Stitch

Aubusson Stitch

Back Stitch

Bargello Stitch

Basketweave Stitch

Bazaar Stitch

Binding Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Diagonal)

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Staggered)

Brazilian Stitch

Brick Stitch

Brighton Stitch

Bullion Knot

Buttonhole Stitch

Buttonhole Stitch (Detached)

Buttonhole Stitch (Double)

Buttonhole Stitch (Tailored)

Buttonhole Stitch (Whipped)

Buttonhole Wheel
 Stitch

Byzantine Stitch

Cable Stitch

Cashmere Stitch

Chain Stitch

Chain Stitch
 (Braided Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Heavy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Interlaced Variation)

Chain Stitch (Lazy
 Daisy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Raised Variation)

Checker Stitch

Continental Stitch

Coral Knot Stitch

Couching Stitch

Couching Stitch (Buttonhole Variation)

Couching Stitch (Herringbone Variation)

Couching Stitch
 (Open Chain  Variation)

Cretan Stitch

Cretan Stitch 
(Diagonal Variation)

Cross Stitch

Cross Stitch (Bound)

Cross Stitch (Diagonal)

Cross Stitch (Heavy)

Cross Stitch (Houndstooth)

Cross Stitch (Reinforced)

Cross Stitch
 (Reversed Double)

Cross Stitch
 (Staggered)

Cross Stitch (St.Andrew)

Cross Stitch
 (St.George)

Cross Stitch (Trame)

Cross Stitch (Triple)

Cross Stitch
 (Two-Sided)

Cross Stitch
 (Woven)

Cushion Stitch

Czar Stitch

Diagonal Stitch

Darning Stitch

Diagonal Buttonhole Stitch

Diagonal Interlaced Stitch

Diagonal Leaf Stitch

Diamond Stitch

Diamond Eyelet Stitch

Diaper Pattern Stitch

Double Cross Stitch

Double Knot Stitch

Double Star Stitch

Double Stitch

Double Straight
 Cross Stitch

Droit Stitch

Eastern Stitch

Economic Stitch

Egyptian Stitch

Encroaching Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Eye Stitch

Eye Stitch with Backstitch

Fan Stitch

Fancy Stitch

Feather Stitch

Fern Stitch

Fishbone Stitch

Fishbone Stitch (Diagonal)

Flame Stitch

Flat Stitch

Flat Stitch (Crossed)

Florentine Stitch

Florentine Stitch (Split)

Fly Stitch (Closed)

French Knot

French Stitch

Ghiordes Knot

Gobelin Stitch

Gobelin Droit Stitch

Gobelin Filling Stitch

Gobelin Stitch 
(Trammed Upright)

Greek Stitch

Half Cross Stitch

Herringbone Stitch

Herringbone Stitch (Double)

Herringbone Gone Wrong Stitch

Herringbone Stitch
 (Six Step)

Hobnail Stitch

Hungarian Stitch

Hungarian Diamond Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch (Diagonal)

Hungarian Point Stitch

Interlocking Gobelin Stitch

Irish Stitch
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