*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
J - Z

Jacquard Stitch

Kalem Stitch

Kelim Stitch

Kilim Stitch

Knitting Stitch

Knitting Stitch (Diagonal)

Knitting Stitch 
(Reverse Tvistom)

Knotted Stitch

Knotted Stitch (Single)

Ladder Stitch

Leaf Stitch

Leaf Stitch (Diagonal)

Leaf Stitch with Backstitch

Leviathan Stitch

Leviathan Stitch (Double)

Leviathan Stitch 
(Triple)

Long Armed Cross Stitch

Long Stitch

Long and Short Stitch

Loop Stitch

Mexican Cross Stitch

Milanese Stitch

Montenegrin Stitch

Moorish Stitch

Mosaic Stitch

Mosaic Stitch (Crossed)

Mound Stitch

Nobuko Stitch

Oblique Stitch

Oblique Stitch (Diagonal)

Oblique Stitch (Reverse)

Oblique Slav Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch with Backstitch

Oriental Stitch

Outline Stitch

Palestrina Stitch

Palace Pattern Stitch

Paris Stitch

Parisian Stitch

Pavillion Stitch

Perspective Stitch

Plait Stitch

Plait Stitch (Crossed)

Plait Stitch (Square)

Plaited Edge Stitch

Plaited Gobelin Stitch

Plaited Interlaced Stitch

Portuguese Cross Stitch

Portuguese Stem Stitch

Princess Pattern Stitch

Pyramid Stitch

Quick Point

Raised Stitch

Raised Cross Stitch

Ray Stitch

Ray Stitch (Expanded)

Renaissance Stitch

Rep Stitch

Reverse Bargello

Reversed Basketweave Stitch

Reversed Cross Stitch

Rhodes Stitch

Ribbed Wheels Stitch

Rice Stitch

Rice Stitch (Padded)

Rococco Stitch

Roman Stitch

Rope Stitch

Roumanian Stitch

Rug Binding Stitch

Rya Stitch

Satin Stitch

Satin Stitch
 (Alternating)

Satin Stitch
 (Padded)

Scotch Stitch

Scotch Stitch (Alternating)

Scotch Stitch (Condensed)

Scotch Stitch (Crossed)

Scotch Stitch (Woven)

Scottish Stitch

Sheaf Stitch

Shell Stitch

Single Knotted Stitch

Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Smyrna Cross Stitch

Sorbello Stitch

Soumak Stitch

Spanish Stitch

Spider Web Stitch

Split Stitch

Sprats Head Stitch

Square Plait Stitch

Star Stitch

Star Stitch (Large)

Stem Stitch

Stem Stitch
 (Diagonal)

Stepped Sheaf Stitch

Surrey Stitch

Sutherland Pattern Stitch

Tapestry Stitch

Tent Stitch

Tent Stitch (Alternating)

Tent Stitch
 (Diagonal Mosaic)

Tie Stitch

Trame

Trammed Tent Stitch

Triangle Stitch

Tufting Stitch

Turkey Stitch

Tvistom Stitch

Two Sided Italian 
Cross Stitch

Upright Cross Stitch

Van Dyke Stitch

Velvet Stitch

Waffle Stitch

Wave Stitch (Closed)

Wave Stitch (Open)

Weaving Stitch

Web Stitch

Wheat Sheaf Stitch

Woven Band Stitch 

Woven Pattern 
Stitch

What Is Needlepoint?

By: Carolyn McNeil
1/1/2008

One of the most confusing aspects of needlepoint is defining the different terms used in needlework. The term "needlework" is the broadest term used to describe any form of creative endeavor that is worked using a needle. Among the many varieties of needlework exists the term "needlepoint", but we will get to that in a moment… Embroidery, quilting, rug making, knitting and crocheting are also covered under the
enormous umbrella of the term "needlework" In this article; we will be discussing needlepoint, embroidery, and tapestry.

First of all, let us get tapestry out of the way. The term "tapestry" is often misused in connection with needlepoint and embroidery. This is not a form of needlework. It is, however, a form of "textile art". Tapestry is a woven fabric, created by hand or machine. The design is created through an intricate weaving process. Needlepoint and embroidery works are often confused with tapestry work because the finished products closely resemble each other. In the simplest terms, needlepoint and embroidery are worked ON the canvas or fabric, whereas tapestry IS the fabric.

Now let us move on to embroidery. Embroidery is the art of embellishing or decorating textile fabric. Almost any fabric may be embroidered. The two most common materials for embroidery are cotton or linen. Throughout the centuries, clothing, furniture and a large assortment of other day to day items have been embroidered. Almost any type of thread may used for embroidery, floss being the most common. Believe it or not – in the past human hair was used to embroider. Personally, I prefer to keep my hair attached to my head and use floss for my embroidery projects. Often, objects may be embroidered into a piece. Decorative stones, beads or shells can be worked into a fabric using embroidery. Until the 19th century embroidery was referred to as "canvas work". During the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries the term "petit point" was commonly used to describe embroidery. Today, petit point refers to needlepoint that is worked on canvas that is 16-mesh or smaller. There are two different methods of classifying embroidery. The first method divides embroidery into two groups: surface embroidery and, as previously mentioned, canvas work. Surface embroidery encompasses any design that is worked on top of the fabric. Canvas work consists of any design that is stitched into the canvas. These two terms are very broad and not very enlightening. I prefer the second method of classifying embroidery. The second method divides embroidery into two groups that are easier to understand: counted thread embroidery and free embroidery. Counted thread embroidery consists of any piece that is worked using a pre-determined pattern. The pattern may be printed on the fabric or not. Counted cross stitch and needlepoint are the two stitches that have pre-determined counted patterns. There are literally hundreds of needlepoint stitches. Many of these stitches started out as embroidery stitches. Yes, I said needlepoint is a form of embroidery. I will get to that in a moment… Free embroidery is a form of embroidery that does not worry about the foundation fabric. A free embroidery piece is worked without counting or design. Each stitch is placed independently, hence the name. Crewel work is an excellent example of free embroidery. 

Finally, we come to needlepoint. What is needlepoint? Needlepoint, as I stated earlier is a form of embroidery. Remember, embroidery was commonly referred to as "canvas work" before the 19th century. Today, canvas work is called needlepoint. While embroidery is worked on either cloth or canvas, needlepoint is worked primarily on canvas. Woolen yarns are used for stitching needlepoint projects. Needlepoint stitches are "patterned" stitches. That is to say, stitches that have pre-determined counted patterns.There are literally hundreds of needlepoint stitches. Many of these stitches started out as embroidery stitches and have been adjusted for needlepoint canvas. Some of the more common needlepoint stitches are: bargello, gobelin stitch, basketweave, tent stitch, continental stitch, back stitch, chain stitch, and diagonal stitch. These are just a few of the many needlepoint stitches available today. 

These are the definitions of tapestry, embroidery and needlepoint in the most simple of terms. Basically, tapestry is the art of weaving the design into a fabric, thus becoming the fabric itself. Embroidery is the art of embellishing and decorating an existing fabric. Needlepoint is the art of working the design into canvas. Whichever type of needlework you choose to engage in, all have the capacity to give many hours of creative pleasure to you.

Welcome to Stitchopedia


Congratulations! You have now 
entered Stitchopedia.com.
Here, you will find diagrams and
directions for any stitch you can think of (and some you've probably never heard of). If you know of any stitches that I have missed (yes, there are probably quite a few), drop me an email and I will add it to the site. Just use the navigation above and click on the type of stitch you are interested in learning about - or - select a specific stitch from the navigation on the right and left sides of the page. You may also use the google search box to find a specific stitch.

Page Set-up:

On the left side of each page you will see
 our basic navigation followed by an 
alphabetical list of stitches that are 
demonstrated in this website. This list of stitches continues on the right side of each page. Click on a specific stitch and you will be directed to the page demonstrating that stitch. You may also use the google search box to search for a specific stitch. Simply type in the stitch you are looking for, check the www.stitchopedia.com box (if this box is not checked the search will be web-wide) and click on search. At this time, you will be directed to a list of search results.

At the top and bottom of each page you
will see navigation that is divided into
five basic needlepoint stitch types plus
the basics. If you choose to use this
navigation, each button will take you to a
page with a list of stitches in that particular stitch group. For example,
Crossed Stitches will list all stitches in the cross stitch group - this is
any stitch that crosses itself at some point.

Each page contains a series of diagrams - illustrating the stitch - plus step-by-step instructions for working the stitch. 


HAPPY STITCHIN'...

The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
Stitch-opedia

An encyclopedia of needlepoint Stitches...

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*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
A - I

2,4,6,8 & Tie Stitch

Algerian Eye Stitch

Algerian Eye Daisy
 Stitch

Algerian Filling Stitch

Algerian Plait Stitch

Alternating Cross 
Stitch

Astrakhan Stitch

Aubusson Stitch

Back Stitch

Bargello Stitch

Basketweave Stitch

Bazaar Stitch

Binding Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Diagonal)

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Staggered)

Brazilian Stitch

Brick Stitch

Brighton Stitch

Bullion Knot

Buttonhole Stitch

Buttonhole Stitch (Detached)

Buttonhole Stitch (Double)

Buttonhole Stitch (Tailored)

Buttonhole Stitch (Whipped)

Buttonhole Wheel
 Stitch

Byzantine Stitch

Cable Stitch

Cashmere Stitch

Chain Stitch

Chain Stitch
 (Braided Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Heavy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Interlaced Variation)

Chain Stitch (Lazy
 Daisy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Raised Variation)

Checker Stitch

Continental Stitch

Coral Knot Stitch

Couching Stitch

Couching Stitch (Buttonhole Variation)

Couching Stitch (Herringbone Variation)

Couching Stitch
 (Open Chain  Variation)

Cretan Stitch

Cretan Stitch 
(Diagonal Variation)

Cross Stitch

Cross Stitch (Bound)

Cross Stitch (Diagonal)

Cross Stitch (Heavy)

Cross Stitch (Houndstooth)

Cross Stitch (Reinforced)

Cross Stitch
 (Reversed Double)

Cross Stitch
 (Staggered)

Cross Stitch (St.Andrew)

Cross Stitch
 (St.George)

Cross Stitch (Trame)

Cross Stitch (Triple)

Cross Stitch
 (Two-Sided)

Cross Stitch
 (Woven)

Cushion Stitch

Czar Stitch

Diagonal Stitch

Darning Stitch

Diagonal Buttonhole Stitch

Diagonal Interlaced Stitch

Diagonal Leaf Stitch

Diamond Stitch

Diamond Eyelet Stitch

Diaper Pattern Stitch

Double Cross Stitch

Double Knot Stitch

Double Star Stitch

Double Stitch

Double Straight
 Cross Stitch

Droit Stitch

Eastern Stitch

Economic Stitch

Egyptian Stitch

Encroaching Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Eye Stitch

Eye Stitch with Backstitch

Fan Stitch

Fancy Stitch

Feather Stitch

Fern Stitch

Fishbone Stitch

Fishbone Stitch (Diagonal)

Flame Stitch

Flat Stitch

Flat Stitch (Crossed)

Florentine Stitch

Florentine Stitch (Split)

Fly Stitch (Closed)

French Knot

French Stitch

Ghiordes Knot

Gobelin Stitch

Gobelin Droit Stitch

Gobelin Filling Stitch

Gobelin Stitch 
(Trammed Upright)

Greek Stitch

Half Cross Stitch

Herringbone Stitch

Herringbone Stitch (Double)

Herringbone Gone Wrong Stitch

Herringbone Stitch
 (Six Step)

Hobnail Stitch

Hungarian Stitch

Hungarian Diamond Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch (Diagonal)

Hungarian Point Stitch

Interlocking Gobelin Stitch

Irish Stitch
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