*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
J - Z

Jacquard Stitch

Kalem Stitch

Kelim Stitch

Kilim Stitch

Knitting Stitch

Knitting Stitch (Diagonal)

Knitting Stitch 
(Reverse Tvistom)

Knotted Stitch

Knotted Stitch (Single)

Ladder Stitch

Leaf Stitch

Leaf Stitch (Diagonal)

Leaf Stitch with Backstitch

Leviathan Stitch

Leviathan Stitch (Double)

Leviathan Stitch 
(Triple)

Long Armed Cross Stitch

Long Stitch

Long and Short Stitch

Loop Stitch

Mexican Cross Stitch

Milanese Stitch

Montenegrin Stitch

Moorish Stitch

Mosaic Stitch

Mosaic Stitch (Crossed)

Mound Stitch

Nobuko Stitch

Oblique Stitch

Oblique Stitch (Diagonal)

Oblique Stitch (Reverse)

Oblique Slav Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch with Backstitch

Oriental Stitch

Outline Stitch

Palestrina Stitch

Palace Pattern Stitch

Paris Stitch

Parisian Stitch

Pavillion Stitch

Perspective Stitch

Plait Stitch

Plait Stitch (Crossed)

Plait Stitch (Square)

Plaited Edge Stitch

Plaited Gobelin Stitch

Plaited Interlaced Stitch

Portuguese Cross Stitch

Portuguese Stem Stitch

Princess Pattern Stitch

Pyramid Stitch

Quick Point

Raised Stitch

Raised Cross Stitch

Ray Stitch

Ray Stitch (Expanded)

Renaissance Stitch

Rep Stitch

Reverse Bargello

Reversed Basketweave Stitch

Reversed Cross Stitch

Rhodes Stitch

Ribbed Wheels Stitch

Rice Stitch

Rice Stitch (Padded)

Rococco Stitch

Roman Stitch

Rope Stitch

Roumanian Stitch

Rug Binding Stitch

Rya Stitch

Satin Stitch

Satin Stitch
 (Alternating)

Satin Stitch
 (Padded)

Scotch Stitch

Scotch Stitch (Alternating)

Scotch Stitch (Condensed)

Scotch Stitch (Crossed)

Scotch Stitch (Woven)

Scottish Stitch

Sheaf Stitch

Shell Stitch

Single Knotted Stitch

Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Smyrna Cross Stitch

Sorbello Stitch

Soumak Stitch

Spanish Stitch

Spider Web Stitch

Split Stitch

Sprats Head Stitch

Square Plait Stitch

Star Stitch

Star Stitch (Large)

Stem Stitch

Stem Stitch
 (Diagonal)

Stepped Sheaf Stitch

Surrey Stitch

Sutherland Pattern Stitch

Tapestry Stitch

Tent Stitch

Tent Stitch (Alternating)

Tent Stitch
 (Diagonal Mosaic)

Tie Stitch

Trame

Trammed Tent Stitch

Triangle Stitch

Tufting Stitch

Turkey Stitch

Tvistom Stitch

Two Sided Italian 
Cross Stitch

Upright Cross Stitch

Van Dyke Stitch

Velvet Stitch

Waffle Stitch

Wave Stitch (Closed)

Wave Stitch (Open)

Weaving Stitch

Web Stitch

Wheat Sheaf Stitch

Woven Band Stitch 

Woven Pattern 
Stitch

Hooking The Night Away…
By: Carolyn McNeil

When I use the term "hooking" I am referring to the craft of latch-hook rug making. Why, what did you think I was going to write about? Well, let's not go there.

First, let me begin with a quick history of rug making. Rug making is a very old form of needle art. It is widely believed that rug making began thousands of years ago with the nomadic tribes of Europe and Asia. Wool harvested from herds of sheep was used to create the first rugs. The oldest rug, found frozen and perfectly preserved in ice, is believed to have been hand-made around the fifth century BCE. The earliest rugs were created by hand, with no needles, latch hooks or tools. They were made using a technique called "knotted pile" rug making. Basically, this style of rug making involves a length of wool being tied – or "knotted" – by hand over and over again. This traditional rug making technique is still used today in some of the Asian countries. Traditional rug making changed a few hundred years ago by adding a hand held hook tool to make the process quicker and easier.

Today, the latch-hook is the most commonly used tool used when creating rugs. The punch needle runs a close second in the rug making popularity race. We will explore thelatch-hook method in a moment. First, let us take a look at some of the needlepoint stitches that may be used to create rugs. These stitches fall into the category known as "looped stitches", aka "pile stitches". All of these stitches create a texture with a three-dimensional look. The pile surface is created by the loops contained in the stitches. Some stitches remain with the loops intact; some require the loops be cut. Other than the basic Loop Stitch, some of the more common rug stitches are the Chain Stitch, the Astrakhan Velvet Stitch and the Surrey Stitch. It should be mentioned, however, that all of these stitches require some knowledge of needlepoint and should not be attempted by a beginner. For the rug making beginner, I would recommend the latch-hook type rug.

Latch-hook rug making, as I stated earlier, is probably the most popular type of rug making today. Not coincidently, it also happens to be the easiest type of rug making today. Basically, a hook (with a latch, hence the name) is used to work the precut lengths of yarn into the rug canvas. The rug canvas is generally 3.3 mesh, however, smaller meshed canvas may be also be used. I have seen two methods of latch-hooking rugs. The first method, the one that I use, is the easiest. Loop the piece of yarn around the end of the hook – the actual "hook" part of the latch-hook – push the hook and yarn down through one square and up under the canvas thread, bringing the hook up into the square above until the latch part of the latch-hook has cleared the canvas thread. Wrap the yarn around the front of the latch hook, while pulling the latch closed as you move the latch-hook back down through the canvas. This will pull the yarn through and create the knot. You may tighten the knot by hand if necessary. The second method requires you to hook the yarn from behind the latch and come around to the front, using more yarn. This method is too complicated and does not  make the rug more durable.

The greatest challenge to latch-hook rug making is finding quality rug kits to work. Shillcraft has been a leading source of latch-hook rugs for many years. They recently re-vamped their website and appear to have added some interesting rugs to their catalog. Currently, I have been working rugs that have been designed by an EBay seller. These are some very exciting designs. The finished rugs look as beautiful as the sample picture promises. I recently completed a rug with a dog design – a pug. I call him "Pugsly, the pug rug" (see image). If you are looking for new and interesting designs, I strongly recommend these rugs. 

Enough of the blatant product promotion! Regardless of what type of rug making you choose, it can be a relaxing and rewarding experience. Take a seat on that comfortable couch, turn the tunes on, adjust the lighting and start hooking the night away…

LOOP STITCH 
The Loop Stitch is a variation of the Buttonhole Stitch. The most important rule of this stitch is to "maintain an even tension". This is not a 
Loop Stitch (Diagram 1):
Bring the needle up at A, follow the red arrows in the above diagram, take the yarn under the canvas thread where noted and create the first loop. Hold the loop in place while you bring the needle down at B. Continue holding the first loop and bring the needle up at C. Create the second loop by working the yarn OVER the yarn of the first loop but UNDER the canvas thread. This second loop will anchor the first loop. Hold the second loop in place while you bring the needle down at D. Continue holding the second loop and bring the needle up at E. Create the third loop by  working the yarn OVER the yarn of the second loop but UNDER the canvas thread. This third loop will anchor the second loop. Hold the third loop in place while you bring the needle down at F. If the loops appear to be crooked when you are finished with the row, simply adjust them with your fingernail until they appear even.
 
tied stitch and must, therefore, be held in place while you work the next stitch. One diagram has been used to demonstrate this stitch. 
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
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*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
A - I

2,4,6,8 & Tie Stitch

Algerian Eye Stitch

Algerian Eye Daisy
 Stitch

Algerian Filling Stitch

Algerian Plait Stitch

Alternating Cross 
Stitch

Astrakhan Stitch

Aubusson Stitch

Back Stitch

Bargello Stitch

Basketweave Stitch

Bazaar Stitch

Binding Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Diagonal)

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Staggered)

Brazilian Stitch

Brick Stitch

Brighton Stitch

Bullion Knot

Buttonhole Stitch

Buttonhole Stitch (Detached)

Buttonhole Stitch (Double)

Buttonhole Stitch (Tailored)

Buttonhole Stitch (Whipped)

Buttonhole Wheel
 Stitch

Byzantine Stitch

Cable Stitch

Cashmere Stitch

Chain Stitch

Chain Stitch
 (Braided Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Heavy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Interlaced Variation)

Chain Stitch (Lazy
 Daisy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Raised Variation)

Checker Stitch

Continental Stitch

Coral Knot Stitch

Couching Stitch

Couching Stitch (Buttonhole Variation)

Couching Stitch (Herringbone Variation)

Couching Stitch
 (Open Chain  Variation)

Cretan Stitch

Cretan Stitch 
(Diagonal Variation)

Cross Stitch

Cross Stitch (Bound)

Cross Stitch (Diagonal)

Cross Stitch (Heavy)

Cross Stitch (Houndstooth)

Cross Stitch (Reinforced)

Cross Stitch
 (Reversed Double)

Cross Stitch
 (Staggered)

Cross Stitch (St.Andrew)

Cross Stitch
 (St.George)

Cross Stitch (Trame)

Cross Stitch (Triple)

Cross Stitch
 (Two-Sided)

Cross Stitch
 (Woven)

Cushion Stitch

Czar Stitch

Diagonal Stitch

Darning Stitch

Diagonal Buttonhole Stitch

Diagonal Interlaced Stitch

Diagonal Leaf Stitch

Diamond Stitch

Diamond Eyelet Stitch

Diaper Pattern Stitch

Double Cross Stitch

Double Knot Stitch

Double Star Stitch

Double Stitch

Double Straight
 Cross Stitch

Droit Stitch

Eastern Stitch

Economic Stitch

Egyptian Stitch

Encroaching Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Eye Stitch

Eye Stitch with Backstitch

Fan Stitch

Fancy Stitch

Feather Stitch

Fern Stitch

Fishbone Stitch

Fishbone Stitch (Diagonal)

Flame Stitch

Flat Stitch

Flat Stitch (Crossed)

Florentine Stitch

Florentine Stitch (Split)

Fly Stitch (Closed)

French Knot

French Stitch

Ghiordes Knot

Gobelin Stitch

Gobelin Droit Stitch

Gobelin Filling Stitch

Gobelin Stitch 
(Trammed Upright)

Greek Stitch

Half Cross Stitch

Herringbone Stitch

Herringbone Stitch (Double)

Herringbone Gone Wrong Stitch

Herringbone Stitch
 (Six Step)

Hobnail Stitch

Hungarian Stitch

Hungarian Diamond Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch (Diagonal)

Hungarian Point Stitch

Interlocking Gobelin Stitch

Irish Stitch
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