*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
J - Z

Jacquard Stitch

Kalem Stitch

Kelim Stitch

Kilim Stitch

Knitting Stitch

Knitting Stitch (Diagonal)

Knitting Stitch 
(Reverse Tvistom)

Knotted Stitch

Knotted Stitch (Single)

Ladder Stitch

Leaf Stitch

Leaf Stitch (Diagonal)

Leaf Stitch with Backstitch

Leviathan Stitch

Leviathan Stitch (Double)

Leviathan Stitch 
(Triple)

Long Armed Cross Stitch

Long Stitch

Long and Short Stitch

Loop Stitch

Mexican Cross Stitch

Milanese Stitch

Montenegrin Stitch

Moorish Stitch

Mosaic Stitch

Mosaic Stitch (Crossed)

Mound Stitch

Nobuko Stitch

Oblique Stitch

Oblique Stitch (Diagonal)

Oblique Stitch (Reverse)

Oblique Slav Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch with Backstitch

Oriental Stitch

Outline Stitch

Palestrina Stitch

Palace Pattern Stitch

Paris Stitch

Parisian Stitch

Pavillion Stitch

Perspective Stitch

Plait Stitch

Plait Stitch (Crossed)

Plait Stitch (Square)

Plaited Edge Stitch

Plaited Gobelin Stitch

Plaited Interlaced Stitch

Portuguese Cross Stitch

Portuguese Stem Stitch

Princess Pattern Stitch

Pyramid Stitch

Quick Point

Raised Stitch

Raised Cross Stitch

Ray Stitch

Ray Stitch (Expanded)

Renaissance Stitch

Rep Stitch

Reverse Bargello

Reversed Basketweave Stitch

Reversed Cross Stitch

Rhodes Stitch

Ribbed Wheels Stitch

Rice Stitch

Rice Stitch (Padded)

Rococco Stitch

Roman Stitch

Rope Stitch

Roumanian Stitch

Rug Binding Stitch

Rya Stitch

Satin Stitch

Satin Stitch
 (Alternating)

Satin Stitch
 (Padded)

Scotch Stitch

Scotch Stitch (Alternating)

Scotch Stitch (Condensed)

Scotch Stitch (Crossed)

Scotch Stitch (Woven)

Scottish Stitch

Sheaf Stitch

Shell Stitch

Single Knotted Stitch

Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Smyrna Cross Stitch

Sorbello Stitch

Soumak Stitch

Spanish Stitch

Spider Web Stitch

Split Stitch

Sprats Head Stitch

Square Plait Stitch

Star Stitch

Star Stitch (Large)

Stem Stitch

Stem Stitch
 (Diagonal)

Stepped Sheaf Stitch

Surrey Stitch

Sutherland Pattern Stitch

Tapestry Stitch

Tent Stitch

Tent Stitch (Alternating)

Tent Stitch
 (Diagonal Mosaic)

Tie Stitch

Trame

Trammed Tent Stitch

Triangle Stitch

Tufting Stitch

Turkey Stitch

Tvistom Stitch

Two Sided Italian 
Cross Stitch

Upright Cross Stitch

Van Dyke Stitch

Velvet Stitch

Waffle Stitch

Wave Stitch (Closed)

Wave Stitch (Open)

Weaving Stitch

Web Stitch

Wheat Sheaf Stitch

Woven Band Stitch 

Woven Pattern 
Stitch


 
ASTRAKHAN VELVET STITCH
The Astrakhan Velvet Stitch is a variation of the velvet stitch. Like the velvet stitch, this stitch is a member of the "Looped Stitch" 
Astrakhan Velvet Stitch - Diagram 1
Astrakhan Velvet Stitch - Diagram 2
Astrakhan Velvet Stitch - Diagram 3
family and also a "Pile Stitch". Pile Stitches are stitches that extend out from the canvas, creating a "pile" effect. The pile is formed by loops. These loops may be cut (for example, when working a rug) or may remain uncut. Instructions for cutting the loops are on the velvet stitch page (see Diagram 7). The velvet stitch may be worked on rug, mono or penelope canvas. When creating the loop, you may choose whatever size you want. Just be sure all of the loops end up the same size. Three diagrams have been used to demonstrate this stitch. 
Astrakhan Velvet Stitch Diagram 1:
Bring the needle up at A and create a loop (any size you choose). Holding the loop in place, bring the needle down at BHelpful Hint: Although the loop you create may be any size that you choose, keep in mind that the longer the loop (or any stitch), the more chance it has to snag and break. Helpful Hint 2: When using this stitch as a rug stitch, be sure to make all of the loops the same size. Now, continue on to diagram 2...
Astrakhan Velvet Stitch Diagram 2:
While holding the loop we created in diagram 1, bring the needle up at C, move up and to the right over two canvas intersections, bring the needle down at B. Bring the needle up at D, move up and to the left over two canvas intersections, bring the needle down at A. This cross stitch should be worked OVER the loop we created in the first diagram, holding it in place. Bring the needle up at B and create a loop. Holding the loop in place, bring the needle down at E. While holding the loop in place, bring the needle up at D, move up and to the right over two canvas intersections, bring the needle down at E. Bring the needle up at F, move up and to the left over two canvas intersections, bring the needle down at B. Again, this cross stitch should be worked OVER the loop we just created, holding it in place. Bring the needle up at E and create a loop. Holding the loop in place, bring the needle down at G. While holding the loop in place, bring the needle up at F, move up and to the right over two canvas intersections, bring the needle down at G. Bring the needle up at H, move up and to the left over two canvas intersections, bring the needle down at E. And yet again, this cross stitch should be worked OVER the loop we just created, holding it in place. Now, continue on to diagram 3...
Astrakhan Velvet Stitch Diagram 3:
This diagram illustrates how the next row should be worked into the first row of stitches.
Confessions Of A Happy Hooker
By: Carolyn McNeil

I admit it. Yes, I confess. I love hooking…latch-hooking, to be more specific. There is a quiet pleasure in the repetition of hooking yarn in those little 3.3 mesh canvas holes that I just can't seem to get enough of. Latch-hook rug making is one of the most relaxing needleart crafts around. And, yes, in spite of the fact that it does not require a needle, I still consider it to be a member of the needleart family.

Rug making has come a long way since the early nomads of Europe and Asia realized that the wool from their sheep could be used to create fabrics and rugs to help stay warm. Back then, rugs were made entirely by hand, using no tools of any kind (needles, hooks, etc.). A knot would be tied around a base material over and over again to form beautiful and creative patterns. Although this method is still used in some Asian countries, most rug making, today, is done using hooks of some type. The basic rug hook was invented about three hundred years ago. Latch-hook rug making is currently the easiest, not to mention most pleasurable, method of working rugs today.

As I stated earlier, I find the most pleasure from the constant repetition of rug hooking. Filling one canvas hole at a time and witnessing the creation of a beautiful design coming to life is fantastic! Years ago, the latch-hook rug designers would print the design directly on the canvas. The designs would be printed in multi-colored inks to make working the rug easy. However, the cost of doing this caused the latch-hook rug kits to become extremely expensive for the consumer. Today, you may still find some of the smaller rug kits with the design printed directly on the canvas. Most of the larger kits, however, consist of blank 3.3 mesh rug canvas, the yarn, plus the design printed on paper. I know, it sounds too difficult to work a rug in this manner, doesn't it? Wrong! It is actually very simple! OK, I must admit that the first time I worked a rug without the design printed on the canvas, I was a little nervous. However, I managed to develop an easy-to-follow system that has worked well for years. To state that the rug canvas included in these kits is blank would be erroneous. The canvas in these kits does, in fact, have a graph printed on it. Every tenth thread on the canvas is marked by a graph line, both vertically and horizontally. The design that is printed on paper is also graphed in the same manner, making it easy to follow. My easy-to-follow method of working latch-hook rugs is to begin by working from the bottom right corner across to the bottom left corner. Work one graph square at a time. Do this by latch-hooking one row of one graph square (this will be ten canvas holes). Once a row is completed, use a marker to draw a line through the corresponding row on the design sheet. Move up to the second row of the graph square and proceed to "hook" that row. Again, once the row is completed, use a marker to draw a line through the corresponding row on the design sheet. I find that this method of "hooking" is quick and prevents me from losing my place – or worse – working the same graph square twice! Yes, I did that on the very first non-printed rug that I did. Fortunately, I caught the mistake in a reasonably short amount of time. I was forced to pull out only one graph section of rug, one hundred canvas holes… Trust me, it is better to keep track of the work in progress, line by line, than be forced to remove and rework an area. 

My most aggravating problem when working latch-hook rugs involves my own physical comfort. I finally found the perfect spot, located in the corner of my couch, to work my rugs. Unfortunately, my cats, Trouble and Mischief, found that particular corner of my couch to be comfortable, too. After a few hours of trying to prevent them from messing up the rows of yarn that I had carefully laid out, I surrendered the couch corner to them. They are now in the process of forming their own government in the area that they conquered. I have fallen back to the middle area of the couch for my rug hooking. 

Now, this is where I have a very helpful hint: I attach the rug canvas to a small pillow (1 foot x 1 foot) using four metal clamps (chip clips or paper holders will work). This allows me to hook into a soft background without having to hold the canvas in place. If you have ever worked a rug on a table or other flat surface, you will understand how difficult it can be. And, yes, I know that there are rug frames available that work just as well. However, the rug frames I have seen are designed for chairs, not sofas. I'm a couch potato, not a chair potato. 

So, find yourself a great latch-hook rug kit, turn on your favorite television show and locate a comfortable couch or chair. You are now ready to hook your way through the television commercials…Happy hookin'…
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
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*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
A - I

2,4,6,8 & Tie Stitch

Algerian Eye Stitch

Algerian Eye Daisy
 Stitch

Algerian Filling Stitch

Algerian Plait Stitch

Alternating Cross 
Stitch

Astrakhan Stitch

Aubusson Stitch

Back Stitch

Bargello Stitch

Basketweave Stitch

Bazaar Stitch

Binding Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Diagonal)

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Staggered)

Brazilian Stitch

Brick Stitch

Brighton Stitch

Bullion Knot

Buttonhole Stitch

Buttonhole Stitch (Detached)

Buttonhole Stitch (Double)

Buttonhole Stitch (Tailored)

Buttonhole Stitch (Whipped)

Buttonhole Wheel
 Stitch

Byzantine Stitch

Cable Stitch

Cashmere Stitch

Chain Stitch

Chain Stitch
 (Braided Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Heavy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Interlaced Variation)

Chain Stitch (Lazy
 Daisy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Raised Variation)

Checker Stitch

Continental Stitch

Coral Knot Stitch

Couching Stitch

Couching Stitch (Buttonhole Variation)

Couching Stitch (Herringbone Variation)

Couching Stitch
 (Open Chain  Variation)

Cretan Stitch

Cretan Stitch 
(Diagonal Variation)

Cross Stitch

Cross Stitch (Bound)

Cross Stitch (Diagonal)

Cross Stitch (Heavy)

Cross Stitch (Houndstooth)

Cross Stitch (Reinforced)

Cross Stitch
 (Reversed Double)

Cross Stitch
 (Staggered)

Cross Stitch (St.Andrew)

Cross Stitch
 (St.George)

Cross Stitch (Trame)

Cross Stitch (Triple)

Cross Stitch
 (Two-Sided)

Cross Stitch
 (Woven)

Cushion Stitch

Czar Stitch

Diagonal Stitch

Darning Stitch

Diagonal Buttonhole Stitch

Diagonal Interlaced Stitch

Diagonal Leaf Stitch

Diamond Stitch

Diamond Eyelet Stitch

Diaper Pattern Stitch

Double Cross Stitch

Double Knot Stitch

Double Star Stitch

Double Stitch

Double Straight
 Cross Stitch

Droit Stitch

Eastern Stitch

Economic Stitch

Egyptian Stitch

Encroaching Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Eye Stitch

Eye Stitch with Backstitch

Fan Stitch

Fancy Stitch

Feather Stitch

Fern Stitch

Fishbone Stitch

Fishbone Stitch (Diagonal)

Flame Stitch

Flat Stitch

Flat Stitch (Crossed)

Florentine Stitch

Florentine Stitch (Split)

Fly Stitch (Closed)

French Knot

French Stitch

Ghiordes Knot

Gobelin Stitch

Gobelin Droit Stitch

Gobelin Filling Stitch

Gobelin Stitch 
(Trammed Upright)

Greek Stitch

Half Cross Stitch

Herringbone Stitch

Herringbone Stitch (Double)

Herringbone Gone Wrong Stitch

Herringbone Stitch
 (Six Step)

Hobnail Stitch

Hungarian Stitch

Hungarian Diamond Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch (Diagonal)

Hungarian Point Stitch

Interlocking Gobelin Stitch

Irish Stitch
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