*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
J - Z

Jacquard Stitch

Kalem Stitch

Kelim Stitch

Kilim Stitch

Knitting Stitch

Knitting Stitch (Diagonal)

Knitting Stitch 
(Reverse Tvistom)

Knotted Stitch

Knotted Stitch (Single)

Ladder Stitch

Leaf Stitch

Leaf Stitch (Diagonal)

Leaf Stitch with Backstitch

Leviathan Stitch

Leviathan Stitch (Double)

Leviathan Stitch 
(Triple)

Long Armed Cross Stitch

Long Stitch

Long and Short Stitch

Loop Stitch

Mexican Cross Stitch

Milanese Stitch

Montenegrin Stitch

Moorish Stitch

Mosaic Stitch

Mosaic Stitch (Crossed)

Mound Stitch

Nobuko Stitch

Oblique Stitch

Oblique Stitch (Diagonal)

Oblique Stitch (Reverse)

Oblique Slav Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch

Oblong Cross Stitch with Backstitch

Oriental Stitch

Outline Stitch

Palestrina Stitch

Palace Pattern Stitch

Paris Stitch

Parisian Stitch

Pavillion Stitch

Perspective Stitch

Plait Stitch

Plait Stitch (Crossed)

Plait Stitch (Square)

Plaited Edge Stitch

Plaited Gobelin Stitch

Plaited Interlaced Stitch

Portuguese Cross Stitch

Portuguese Stem Stitch

Princess Pattern Stitch

Pyramid Stitch

Quick Point

Raised Stitch

Raised Cross Stitch

Ray Stitch

Ray Stitch (Expanded)

Renaissance Stitch

Rep Stitch

Reverse Bargello

Reversed Basketweave Stitch

Reversed Cross Stitch

Rhodes Stitch

Ribbed Wheels Stitch

Rice Stitch

Rice Stitch (Padded)

Rococco Stitch

Roman Stitch

Rope Stitch

Roumanian Stitch

Rug Binding Stitch

Rya Stitch

Satin Stitch

Satin Stitch
 (Alternating)

Satin Stitch
 (Padded)

Scotch Stitch

Scotch Stitch (Alternating)

Scotch Stitch (Condensed)

Scotch Stitch (Crossed)

Scotch Stitch (Woven)

Scottish Stitch

Sheaf Stitch

Shell Stitch

Single Knotted Stitch

Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Smyrna Cross Stitch

Sorbello Stitch

Soumak Stitch

Spanish Stitch

Spider Web Stitch

Split Stitch

Sprats Head Stitch

Square Plait Stitch

Star Stitch

Star Stitch (Large)

Stem Stitch

Stem Stitch
 (Diagonal)

Stepped Sheaf Stitch

Surrey Stitch

Sutherland Pattern Stitch

Tapestry Stitch

Tent Stitch

Tent Stitch (Alternating)

Tent Stitch
 (Diagonal Mosaic)

Tie Stitch

Trame

Trammed Tent Stitch

Triangle Stitch

Tufting Stitch

Turkey Stitch

Tvistom Stitch

Two Sided Italian 
Cross Stitch

Upright Cross Stitch

Van Dyke Stitch

Velvet Stitch

Waffle Stitch

Wave Stitch (Closed)

Wave Stitch (Open)

Weaving Stitch

Web Stitch

Wheat Sheaf Stitch

Woven Band Stitch 

Woven Pattern 
Stitch


Hoop Frame
Scroll Frame
 
THE BASICS
-FRAMES-
Using a frame for your needlepoint project is highly recommended. Not 
only will the frame free your hands to work the stitches, it will also help maintain an even stitch tension. Frames help to prevent the canvas from being distorted during the stitching process. Some stitches, like cross stitches, can force the canvas to change shape. Using a frame will reduce this problem. The type of frame required will depend on the size of the needlepoint piece.
Hoop (aka Tambour) Frame: This frame consists of two hoops (hence the name). One hoop is placed on top of the other hoop and secured by a screw on the side. Basically, you would lay your piece of cloth over the first hoop, place the second hoop on top and proceed to tighten the screw. Hoop Frames are best for small detailed work.

Scroll Frame: This frame consists of two dowels that fit into two straight sides. The sides are generally secured by screws on each of the four corners. These screws are used to tighten the sides to the dowels. Scroll Frames are especially useful for large pieces. The canvas would be attached (flat-head thumbtacks are best) to each dowel, with the bottom dowel being turned - or scrolled - until the canvas is tight. The sides of the canvas would then need to be attached to the two straight wooden sides. Again, flat-head thumbtacks work best. This pulls the canvas in four directions. Once you have finished working the area that is visible, simply remove the side thumbtacks, unscrew the tightener screws, roll (scroll) the canvas up until you reach the next portion of your piece, tighten the tightener screws and attach the canvas to the sides, again, with flat-head thumbtacks.

Stretcher Bar Frame: This frame consists of four straight wooden pieces that are assembled to create a square or rectangle. The canvas is attached to all four straight wooden pieces (flat-head thumbtacks are best, but you may use staples). This frame is available in many different sizes. Be sure to choose a size that is sufficient for your piece. The inside measurements of the frame should be slightly larger than the area of the canvas  that is to be worked. Stretcher Bar Frames may also be used to frame the finished piece (see Finishing).

These are the basic frames available. There are, however, attachments you may purchase to make stitching your projects easier. For example, you may want to add a floor stand to your frame to free your hands from holding it. See the advertisement section below for ideas.
TYPES OF FRAMES:
While many needlepoint books and resources insist that the use of a frame is not necessary for most projects, I am unable to imagine working any needlepoint project without one. 

There are two important reasons to use a frame for needlepoint. The first and most important reason for using a frame is to prevent the canvas from becoming distorted by the stitches. The second reason supports the first reason. Working with a frame will free your hands, allowing you to maintain an even rhythm as you work the needle up and down through the canvas. This will enable you to keep your stitch tension even. An even stitch tension is the major factor in preventing canvas distortion. Proper stitch tension will allow the yarn to be kept taut around the canvas threads. Stitch tension that is too loose will cause snagging. Stitch tension that is too tight will, again, distort the canvas. If the canvas becomes severely distorted, finishing the project with a wall frame may become impossible.

There are two basic types of needlepoint frames – the round (hoop) frame and the straight frame. The hoop frame is sometimes referred to as the tambour frame. This round frame consists of two rings (hoops). The canvas or material would be placed on top of the smaller hoop and the larger hoop would then be placed over the smaller hoop (with the canvas) and tightened by an outside screw. The fabric must be kept taut when the larger hoop is screwed in. Hoop frames are suited to fine detailed work (like embroidery) and should be used when working with softer canvases, such as aida cloth or linen. Hoop frames are available in many sizes, from four inches to twelve inches in diameter. They are also available with many attachments that help make working your project a little easier. The most common hoop frame is the Hand-Held Hoop. This is an extremely portable hoop frame and is available in wood, plastic or metal. The Standing Hoop is the basic hand-held hoop attached to a floor stand. These are generally made of wood and can be adjusted for height and hoop angle. The Fanny Hoop is the basic hand-held hoop attached to a flat stand. This hoop stand may be worked on a table. The most common use for the Fanny Hoop is to sit on the flat part of the stand and work your project. This is where the name comes from. It should be noted that the angle of the hoop may not be adjustable with the Fanny Hoop. There are also hoops available with clamps that attach to the side of a table. These are height and angle adjustable. 

The straight frame has also been referred to as the slate frame. The most commonly used straight frame is the Scroll Frame. This frame consists of two dowels that fit into two straight sides. The sides are generally secured by screws on each of the four corners. These screws are used to tighten the sides to the dowels. Scroll Frames are especially useful for large pieces. The canvas would be attached (flat-head thumbtacks are best) to each dowel, with the bottom dowel being turned - or scrolled - until the canvas is tight. The sides of the canvas would then need to be attached to the two straight wooden sides. Again, flat-head thumbtacks work best. This pulls the canvas in four directions. Once you have finished working the area that is visible, simply remove the side thumbtacks, unscrew the tightener screws, roll (scroll) the canvas up until you reach the next portion of your piece, tighten the tightener screws and attach the canvas to the sides, again, with flat-head thumbtacks. Another common straight frame is the Stretcher Bar Frame. The Stretcher Bar Frame consists of four straight wooden pieces that are assembled to create a square or rectangle. The canvas is attached to all four straight wooden pieces (flat-head thumbtacks are best, but you may use staples). This frame is available in many different sizes. Be sure to choose a size that is sufficient for your piece. The inside measurements of the frame should be slightly larger than the area of the canvas that is to be worked. Stretcher Bar Frames may also be used to frame the finished piece. As with hoop frames, straight frames have a few attachments available to make your project easier to work. Straight frames may be mounted on floor stands, keeping your hands completely free. The height and angle of the frame are adjustable with floor stands. Some straight frames come equipped with a sit-on stand. Again, the height and angle of the frame are adjustable.

The final decision about working with a frame is, of course, up to you. 
To Frame Or Not To Frame, That Is The Question
By: Carolyn McNeil
8/1/2007
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)The Four F's (Fish, Fowl, Flowers, Flutterbys)
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*Stitch Index* 
(Alphabetical)
A - I

2,4,6,8 & Tie Stitch

Algerian Eye Stitch

Algerian Eye Daisy
 Stitch

Algerian Filling Stitch

Algerian Plait Stitch

Alternating Cross 
Stitch

Astrakhan Stitch

Aubusson Stitch

Back Stitch

Bargello Stitch

Basketweave Stitch

Bazaar Stitch

Binding Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Diagonal)

Bokhara Couching Stitch (Staggered)

Brazilian Stitch

Brick Stitch

Brighton Stitch

Bullion Knot

Buttonhole Stitch

Buttonhole Stitch (Detached)

Buttonhole Stitch (Double)

Buttonhole Stitch (Tailored)

Buttonhole Stitch (Whipped)

Buttonhole Wheel
 Stitch

Byzantine Stitch

Cable Stitch

Cashmere Stitch

Chain Stitch

Chain Stitch
 (Braided Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Heavy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Interlaced Variation)

Chain Stitch (Lazy
 Daisy Variation)

Chain Stitch
 (Raised Variation)

Checker Stitch

Continental Stitch

Coral Knot Stitch

Couching Stitch

Couching Stitch (Buttonhole Variation)

Couching Stitch (Herringbone Variation)

Couching Stitch
 (Open Chain  Variation)

Cretan Stitch

Cretan Stitch 
(Diagonal Variation)

Cross Stitch

Cross Stitch (Bound)

Cross Stitch (Diagonal)

Cross Stitch (Heavy)

Cross Stitch (Houndstooth)

Cross Stitch (Reinforced)

Cross Stitch
 (Reversed Double)

Cross Stitch
 (Staggered)

Cross Stitch (St.Andrew)

Cross Stitch
 (St.George)

Cross Stitch (Trame)

Cross Stitch (Triple)

Cross Stitch
 (Two-Sided)

Cross Stitch
 (Woven)

Cushion Stitch

Czar Stitch

Diagonal Stitch

Darning Stitch

Diagonal Buttonhole Stitch

Diagonal Interlaced Stitch

Diagonal Leaf Stitch

Diamond Stitch

Diamond Eyelet Stitch

Diaper Pattern Stitch

Double Cross Stitch

Double Knot Stitch

Double Star Stitch

Double Stitch

Double Straight
 Cross Stitch

Droit Stitch

Eastern Stitch

Economic Stitch

Egyptian Stitch

Encroaching Slanted Gobelin Stitch

Eye Stitch

Eye Stitch with Backstitch

Fan Stitch

Fancy Stitch

Feather Stitch

Fern Stitch

Fishbone Stitch

Fishbone Stitch (Diagonal)

Flame Stitch

Flat Stitch

Flat Stitch (Crossed)

Florentine Stitch

Florentine Stitch (Split)

Fly Stitch (Closed)

French Knot

French Stitch

Ghiordes Knot

Gobelin Stitch

Gobelin Droit Stitch

Gobelin Filling Stitch

Gobelin Stitch 
(Trammed Upright)

Greek Stitch

Half Cross Stitch

Herringbone Stitch

Herringbone Stitch (Double)

Herringbone Gone Wrong Stitch

Herringbone Stitch
 (Six Step)

Hobnail Stitch

Hungarian Stitch

Hungarian Diamond Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch

Hungarian Ground 
Stitch (Diagonal)

Hungarian Point Stitch

Interlocking Gobelin Stitch

Irish Stitch
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